Posted tagged ‘St. Louis Post-Dispatch’

Lee will publish food magazine in St. Louis

July 6, 2010

Lee Enterprises, based in Davenport, Iowa, in August will begin producing a new food publication — “Feast” — for the St. Louis area. The free magazine will have a circulation of 70,000 distributed at more than 500 locations.
Lee, publisher of the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, Suburban Journals, Ladue News and “St. Louis’ Best Bridal” magazine, described “Feast” as “a culinary magazine that celebrates St. Louis’ food culture.”
Catherine Neville, co-founder and former editor of “Sauce Magazine,” is publisher of “Feast,” which “will serve as the backbone of the Feast Media brand,” Lee said.

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Missouri Sunshine Coalition to hold inaugural meeting

February 11, 2009

Feb. 11, 2009

By Jim Robertson
Columbia Daily Tribune

A new organization for people who want to promote government openness at all levels in Missouri will hold a public reception and program on Thursday, March 12, in Columbia. The event is free.

The Missouri Sunshine Coalition is seeking individual and organization members from all areas of the public. It will hold a 2 p.m. reception and 3 p.m. program at the Reynolds Journalism Institute at the School of Journalism at MU.
Missouri Attorney General Chris Koster has been invited to speak at the 3 p.m. program. Other speakers will be Charles Davis, director of the National Freedom of Information Center, which is based at the School of Journalism; and Mike Wood, director of governmental relations for the Missouri State Teachers Association.

The group’s founders have met three times to elect a board of directors, to approve bylaws and a mission statement, and to plan the March 12 program. On Jan. 15 the group elected Jim Robertson, managing editor of the Columbia Daily Tribune, president.

Until now, Missouri was one of the few states in the country that did not have an organization whose mission is to promote government transparency. This group hopes to bring together all individuals and organizations in Missouri who want to minimize secrecy in the operations of local and state government agencies.

Following is the Mission Statement of the Missouri Sunshine Coalition, Inc.
1. Members of the Missouri Sunshine Coalition believe the best form of government is that which operates in a free and open environment, giving its citizens unfettered access to information as to its activities and the use of its public funds.
2. We believe government exists to serve its citizens and access to such information should be simple and at minimal cost.
3. The Missouri Sunshine Coalition exists to support citizens of this State in their efforts to exercise their rights under the Missouri Sunshine Law, which is premised on the foundation that “It is the public policy of this state that meetings, records, votes, actions and deliberations of public governmental bodies be open to the public unless otherwise provided by law.”

Serving the Coalition with Robertson are Vice President Jo Sapp, Columbia, League of Women Voters; Secretary Jean Maneke, Kansas City, an attorney who is an expert on the Missouri Sunshine Law; and Treasurer Mike Sherry, Kansas City, Kansas City Business Journal.

Members of the Board of Directors are Jean Buchanan, St. Louis Post-Dispatch; Jack Whitaker, Hannibal Courier-Post; Don Hicks, Jefferson City, Missouri Broadcasters Association; Brenda Jones, St Louis, American Civil Liberties Union of eastern Missouri; and Randy Picht, Kansas City, The Associated Press.

The officers and directors were chosen from among those who attended the organizational meetings of the Coalition.

Membership in the coalition costs $25 for an organization or individual.

For more information on membership or to RSVP for the March 12 event, please contact Kristie Williams, kwilliams@socket.net, 573-449-4167.

Citizens across Missouri call for stronger Sunshine Law

February 11, 2009

By Virginia Young
ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH JEFFERSON CITY BUREAU CHIEF
02/11/2009

JEFFERSON CITY — From Brentwood to Cape Girardeau to Rolla, citizens who have battled for more openness at City Hall urged legislators Tuesday to strengthen the state’s Sunshine Law.

The witnesses told a House committee that current law provides inadequate notice of public meetings, especially when private land is being taken for commercial development. They also argued for tougher penalties, clearer record-keeping provisions and a right to electronic copies of public records.

“Elected officials should be trying to find ways to conduct business in the open, not to find ways to close things,” said Jay C. Purcell, a county commissioner in Cape Girardeau County.

The bill’s sponsor, Rep. Tim Jones, R-Eureka, said problems at the local level had spurred the proposed changes in the Open Meetings and Records Law.

For example, some municipalities have called meetings on 24 hours’ notice — the minimum time required by law — to approve developers’ plans in St. Louis County. Jones’ bill would require five days’ notice if the agenda included subjects such as tax increases, eminent domain or tax-increment financing.

Another change would require newly elected officials to abide by the Sunshine Law even before they were sworn in. If they met with other officials and the group constituted a quorum, the meeting would be open under Jones’ bill.

Officials who violated the law could be fined up to $500, even if the violation was unintentional. Those who purposely violated the law could be fined up to $8,000.

Under current law, those who “knowingly” violate the law can be fined up to $1,000. Those who “purposely” violate it can face fines ranging up to $5,000.

The bill also would open up the complaints filed with Missouri Ethics Commission. However, investigative reports would remain closed during an inquiry and would be permanently closed if the complaint was dismissed.

Former Ethics Commissioner John Maupin, of Creve Coeur, supported the bill. He said current restrictions made it impossible for commissioners to confirm the status of complaints and “allowed people to abuse the system.”

Groups representing local officials say the bill goes too far.

Gary Markenson, a lobbyist for the Missouri Municipal League, objected to requiring five days’ notice for meetings and lowering the threshold for fines when violations are unintentional.

Opponents also said small towns lacked the staff to compile detailed accounts of their meetings. If minutes must be written up every time two of the three county commissioners ride together in a car, “you’re going to require them to drive individually or have someone taking notes,” said Todd Smith, a lobbyist for the Missouri Association of Counties.

Jones said the House General Laws Committee, which he heads, would fine-tune the bill before sending it to the House floor for debate.

The bill is HB316.

Obit – Wayne Leeman

January 6, 2009

Wayne Leeman, 93, St. Louis, a news employee of the St. Louis Post-Dispatch for 46 years, died Nov. 5, 2008.
Mr. Leeman’s work included serving as outstate news editor.
He is survived by his wife, Carolyn; a daughter and four sons.

Obit – Selwyn Pepper

October 7, 2008

Selwyn Pepper, 93, who wrote for the St. Louis Post-Dispatch for many years, died Sept. 4, 2008. He became a part-time reporter for the Post-Dispatch at the age of 16.
Mr. Pepper edited his high school newspaper and then the student newspaper at Washington University, where he earned a political science degree in 1935. He then went to work for the Post-Dispatch.
During his 50-year career, he was city editor, features editor, news editor and readers’ advocate. As a reporter and rewrite man he contributed to three Pulitzer Prize-winning projects.
Mr. Pepper’s daughter, Miriam, is the editorial page editor of The Kansas City Star.
He was preceded in death by his wife of 63 years, Naomi. Survivors are another daughter, four grandchildren and four great-grandchildren.

100 years of cartoons on display

October 7, 2008

Editorial cartoons by Daniel “Fitz” Fitzpatrick and Tom Engelhardt are featured in an exhibit in the State Historical Society of Missouri in Columbia.
The exhibit, “100 Years of Election Cartoons: 1908-2008,” opened in September during the 100th anniversary of the founding of the Missouri School of Journalism.
Fitzpatrick and Engelhardt both retired from the St. Louis Post-Dispatch.
Engelhardt succeeded Fitzpatrick, his idol, as the paper’s editorial cartoonist. Engelhardt, 77, will talk about the exhibit on Oct. 13 in the main gallery of the Historical Society.
Fitzpatrick, who retired from the Post-Dispatch in 1958, donated a large number of his cartoons to the Historical Society. He died in 1969.
The Society’s collection of more than 8,000 editorial cartoons is considered among the best in the nation.

ON THE MOVE – August

August 14, 2008

Here is the On the Move column so far for the September magazine.

€ West Plains ‹ Dennis Crider retired Aug. 1 as sports editor of the West Plains Daily Quill.
Crider joined the Quill in 1969 as a writer/photographer. Allison Wilson took over as sports editor.
In his farewell message, Crider said he planned to travel with his wife, Phyllis, play music, work on a couple of books and expend on selling photographs at arts and crafts shows.

€ Springfield ‹ Dorothy Gardner retired on Aug. 17 as vice president after 20 years with the Springfield Business Journal. She plans to spend more time with her family and with volunteer work.

€ Platte City ‹ Patty Stubbs, owner with her husband Lee of the Platte County Citizen, has become a licensed emergency medical technician and is working on getting paramedic certification.
She has ceased working at the newspaper, where she was the office manager and helped with sales and production.

€ Rolla ‹ Floyd Jernigan was named publisher of the Waynesville Daily Guide and the Rolla Daily News beginning Aug. 4. He replaced Joel Goodridge.
Jernigan, 52, previously was publisher of the Duncan Banner in Oklahoma, a daily newspaper of about 8,000 circulation. He also has been publisher of the East Oregonian in Pendleton, Oregon, and the News-Record in Miami, Okla.
Jernigan and his wife, Barbara, have three children.
GateHouse Media Inc. owns the Rolla and Waynesville papers.

€ Mercer ‹ Sheila Hogue has joined the Mercer Mirror as a writer, photographer and ad sales rep. She spent her youth in the Missouri and Arkansas areas but moved to Mercer from Dallas, Texas.
She has worked around the country as a photographer and entertainer. Before joining the weekly she was secretary for the Princeton/Mercer United Methodist Church.

€ Independence ‹ Michael Glover has joined the staff of The Examiner as the reporter covering health and public safety and Jackson County government.
A Higginsville native, Glover is a 1999 graduate of Lafayette County High School. He earned a degree in journalism from Missouri State in 2004.
Glover worked for more than three years as a reporter for the Fort Scott Tribune in Kansas.

€ Holden ‹ Joanie Lerda is a new ad sales rep for the Holden Image and Penny Saver shopper. She also sells for the Lone Jack Corridor and the Crest Ridge Corridor.
Lerda and her son live in Holden.

€ Marshall ‹ Rachel Harper has left the news staff of the Marshall Democrat-News. She now is a unit public affairs representative for the Missouri Army National Guard. She focuses on units and armories in Clinton, Harrisonville, Lexington, Marshall, Sedalia, Warrensburg and Whiteman Air Force Base.

€ Cassville ‹ Leatrice Strother retired as editor of The Barry County Advertiser in July. She had worked with The Advertiser since August 1976.
Melonie Roberts of Pierce City succeeded Strother. Roberts has worked at The Branson Beacon, The Miller Press, The Greenfield Vedette, The Marionville Free Press and The Monett Times.

€ St. Louis ‹ The Post-Dispatch has promoted Blake Dickie to vice president of production. Dickie has been with the newspaper since 2002 and has overseen the production department since 2007.

€ Republic ‹ Rodger Wheeler has been named sports editor of the Republic Monitor.

€ Kansas City ‹ The Star has promoted Tim Doty from director of classified advertising to vice president over all advertising. Doty, 51, succeeds Peter Ricker, who left the paper in May to become senior vice president of advertising at The Arizona Republic in Phoenix.
This is Doty’s second stint with The Star, following jobs with newspapers in Arkansas, Tennessee, Ohio and Indiana. He first joined The Star in 1984 as an account executive. He left in 1990 to become retail sales manager of The Arkansas Gazette in Little Rock.
Doty returned to Kansas City in 2007 to become vice president of marketing for Firefly Marketing Communications. In December he rejoined The Star as director of classified advertising.
He now oversees about 200 employees. He is a graduate of the University of Kansas, is married and has two children.