Posted tagged ‘Inland Press Association’

Obit – Kenneth Bronson

October 26, 2010

Kenneth C. Bronson, 77, who spent 39 years with Stauffer Communications Inc. and was a sought-after newspaper consultant for decades, died Monday (Oct. 25, 2010) in Topeka.

Services are set for 10 a.m. Friday (Oct. 29, 2010) at First Christian Church, 1880 S.W. Gage Blvd., in Topeka. The family will greet visitors at 9 a.m. at the church prior to the service. Burial will be in Mt. Hope Cemetery. Penwell-Gabel Mid-Town Chapel is in charge of arrangements.

Cards may be sent to Edith Bronson in care of the funeral home: Penwell-Gabel, 1321 S.W. 10th, Topeka, KS 66604. Memorials are suggested to the Kansas Newspaper Foundation, 5423 S.W. 7th, Topeka, KS 66606; the First Christian Church, 1880 S.W. Gage Blvd., Topeka, KS 66604; or the Alzheimer’s Association, all in care of the funeral home.

Bronson was born April 15, 1933 and grew up in Kensington in north-central Kansas.

Bronson was a frequent presenter at Missouri Press state and district meetings in recent years.

He began his career in Topeka at the State Journal and Daily Capital, where he started as a sports writer in 1952 and later became state editor and news editor.

After his marriage to Edith MacArthur in 1959, the Bronsons purchased a weekly newspaper in Pierce City, Mo., and built it into an award-winner in one year.

He rejoined Stauffer in 1962 as editor of the Independence (Mo.) Examiner. Stauffer Communications transferred Bronson to Pittsburg in 1966 where he became editor and publisher of the Pittsburg Headlight and the Pittsburg Sun. He merged the two newspapers in the fall of 1966 as The Headlight-Sun as a seven-day newspaper and later converted it to a morning newspaper, the Morning Sun.

At Pittsburg, he installed the first small newspaper newsroom computer system west of the Mississippi, was a pioneer in computerizing the business operation, built a new building and installed a new Goss Urbanite press in 1973.

Oscar Stauffer, founder of Stauffer Publications, later to become known as Stauffer Communications, asked Bronson in 1976 to oversee the Stauffer newspapers as vice president. Bronson moved to Topeka in 1977 and later was given the title of senior vice president. He was responsible for a division that grew from 12 newspapers to 22 newspaper plants, producing more than 30 newspaper and shopper products.

Bronson started Stauffer Media Systems in 1976 after designing and implementing business computers at Pittsburg. He built the company into a leading vendor of newspaper software products, including the Stauffer Gold Electronic Library and Stauffer Audiotext Systems. The company also operated four retail computer stores and marketed newsroom and business systems to newspapers.

When Stauffer Communications was preparing to sell the company in 1993, Bronson moved to Indiana to work for an old friend, John Nixon, who had called and asked him to be chief operating officer for Nixon Newspapers. He retired from that position on June 30, 1997, and up until a few years ago had been traveling around the nation sharing his expertise with newspapers of all sizes and with newspaper associations.

Bronson was president of KPA in 1975-76 and of the Inland Press Association in 1992. He also had been president of the Kansas-Missouri Associated Press editors and publishers, chairman of the Inland Group Executives Seminar, a director of the Mid-America Press Institute in St. Louis and a trustee of the William Allen White Foundation. After he joined Nixon, he became a director of the PAGE national newspaper cooperative.

He presented more than 200 seminars and workshops for state and regional newspaper associations, spoke at the American Newspaper Publishers Association’s national conventions, at the National Newspaper Association national convention multiple times, at National Newspaper Foundation seminars and at many Inland Press Association and state press association conventions. He also had been a speaker at judicial conferences, both on the state and national level.

Bronson has served on the board of directors of the American Judicature Society and as a director of the Christian Board of Publications. He twice has been president of local Rotary clubs and is a Paul Harris Rotary Fellow. He was president of two chambers of commerce and was on the board of the Kansas State Chamber of Commerce. He has been on the boards of a community college, two hospitals, a public library, United Way, a Boys Club, Junior Achievement and his church where he is an elder on the local level and an officer on the regional level. During his 19-year stint as one of two nonlawyers on the Kansas Commission for Judicial Qualifications, the Supreme Court of Kansas awarded him its first-ever Kansas Justice Award in 1989 “for distinguished contributions to the improvement of justice in Kansas.” He was the first nonlawyer and nonjudge ever to chair the commission and spoke at many state and national judicial meetings.

A native of Kensington, a small farming community in north-central Kansas, Bronson attended the University of Kansas and graduated from Washburn University in Topeka after a tour of duty in the U.S. Navy. He served on the USS Boxer aircraft carrier, where he published a weekly newspaper and was editor and publisher of a history book of the ship. The latter effort involved working with a Japanese printing company and earned him a commendation from the ship’s captain. Bronson was elected to the Kensington High School Hall of Fame in 1971.

He served as interim executive director of the Kansas Press Association twice (in 2000 and 2003) and was director of the Kansas Newspaper Foundation from 2005 to 2007.

He was elected to the Kansas Newspaper Hall of Fame in 2002.

He is survived by his wife, Edith, three children, Brian, Laura and Linda, and two grandchildren.

The Bronsons also traveled extensively on Inland Press Study Missions, which have involved meeting with government officials, press associations and newspaper editors. Their trips have included: Albania, Andorra, Argentina, Australia, Botswana, Brazil, Bulgaria, Chile, China, Costa Rica, Denmark, Ecuador, England, France, Greece, Hong Kong, Hungary, Italy, Kenya, Monaco, Norway, Peru, Romania, San Marino, South Africa, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Taiwan, Turkey, Venezuela, Yugoslavia and Zimbabwe.

Inland Ad Execs Conference June 15-16

June 9, 2010

Inland Press Association’s Advertising Executives Conference 2010 will be held June 15-16 at the Doubletree Hotel Chicago in Arlington Heights, Ill. For complete information go to http://www.regonline.com/builder/site/Default.aspx?eventid=850422.

Small papers mostly avoid industry woes

August 11, 2009

By MICHAEL LIEDTKE
The Associated Press
Monday, August 10, 2009

Newspapers are hurting all over the United States, but the pain is less severe at small publications such as The Blackshear Times in Georgia.

The weekly newspaper fills an information vacuum in a county of 17,000 people who live about 75 miles from the closest metropolitan market, in Jacksonville, Fla. That has made it easier for The Times to hold on to its 3,500 subscribers and keep its revenue stable in a recession that’s ravaging much of the newspaper industry.

“CNN is not coming to my town to cover the news, and there aren’t a whole lot of bloggers here, either,” said Robert Williams, The Times’ editor and publisher. “Community newspapers are still a great investment because we provide something you can’t get anywhere else.”

The scarcity of other media in small- and medium-sized cities has helped shield hundreds of newspapers from the upheaval that’s causing dailies in big cities to shrink in size and scope as their print circulations and advertising sales decline.

Less competition means the print editions and Web sites of smaller newspapers remain the focal points for finding out what’s happening in their coverage areas.

In contrast, large newspapers carry more national news, as well as local, and have many competitors, including Web sites and television and radio stations. They report much of the news the day before printed newspapers reach homes and newsstands. Large newspapers’ Web sites also provide the news for free a day ahead of print editions.

Perhaps even more important, newspapers in smaller markets still haven’t lost a big chunk of their revenue to Craigslist and other online classified advertising alternatives that have become the bane of large newspapers.

Print ads for everything from jobs to jalopies were a gold mine for newspapers until Craigslist began expanding an online service for free classified ads in 1999. Today, Craigslist blankets most major metropolitan markets while publishing about 40 million classified ads each month.

In 2000, classified advertising accounted for nearly $20 billion, or about 40 percent, of the U.S. newspaper industry’s revenue. In 2008, classified ads in U.S. newspapers had dwindled to less than $10 billion, or about one-quarter of the industry’s revenue. Subscription and single-copy sales traditionally contribute just 20 to 30 percent of newspapers’ revenue.

Now it appears the highly profitable classified ads in the print editions of large newspapers could dwindle to virtually nothing within the next few years, said media analyst Mike Simonton of Fitch Ratings. “There is still more pain,” he predicted.

Smaller newspapers have been defying the ominous trend, based on a recent study of the finances at 125 U.S. newspapers of different sizes by the Inland Press Association, a trade group. The classified ad revenue among daily newspapers with circulations of less than 15,000 actually rose by an average of 23 percent in the five years ending in 2008, the study found.

Overall ad revenue for daily newspapers with less than 15,000 in circulation rose by an average of 2.5 percent in the same time frame. Meanwhile, ad revenue dropped 25 percent at daily newspapers with circulations greater than 80,000, according to Inland Press. “The bigger they are, the harder they are falling,” said Ray Carlsen, Inland Press’ executive director. Smaller newspapers also have largely avoided the deep staff cuts made by the rest of the newspaper industry, which has eliminated more than 100,000 jobs since 2005.

The Inland Press study found daily newspapers with circulations of less than 50,000 were spending more on their newsrooms in 2008 than they were in 2004.