Archive for March 2008

Man ‘got hooked’ on old papers; writes history of Pineville people

March 31, 2008

In 1960, James Reed inherited a stack of newspapers that towered over his six-foot-plus frame. He hauled them to Tulsa, Okla., where they languished in his attic for 20 years.
“I meant to look at them when I had the time,” Reed told a writer for McDonald County Newspapers.
The newspapers were printed in the 1800s by Reed’s great-great-grandfather, Claiborne “Claib” Duval, editor of the Pineville Herald, the only newspaper in McDonald County at the time.
In 1980 Reed took a closer look at the eight-foot stack of newspapers. “I got curious, and I got hooked,” he said.
For the next six years, Reed produced a hand-written, 3,000-page work called “Pineville and Its People.” It followed the lives of more than 80 families from 1883 to 1942.
Now a resident of Powell in eastern McDonald County, Reed dedicates several hours a day to reviewing the old, fragile newspapers and producing a series of books called “A Unique Little History of McDonald County, Missouri.”
Each volume is a year’s worth of news gathered from Duval’s column titled “Pineville News.”
“The newspapers I inherited are in pretty good condition and the collection is almost complete. I’m only missing a few issues from each year,” Reed said.
Now retired, his goal is to transcribe four volumes a year.
Among the entries:
“Jan. 11, 1884—The cold that struck us so suddenly last week was much more severe on our northern neighbors. At Pleasant Hill the thermometers marked 30 degrees below zero. Two children were frozen to death. A carload of 14 mules on the L&S R.R. were frozen to death and two carloads of cattle were frozen to death between Pleasant Hill and Nevada …
“Jan. 14, 1884—Last Wednesday night two girl-loving boys brought their girls to the reading society, then took them to the drug store to treat them. After setting up the cigars, a pound of candy, and various other things, they called for a dram, but the boy who kept the drug store very prudently refused to let them have it, for fear it would make them so sick they couldn’t get home, as they were already very sick from love.”
“I’m midway through with 1887,” Reed said. “I figure this endeavor will keep me busy for the next 15 years. I’ll finish this when I’m 77!”
—Southwest City Republic

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Press club honors Bartimus, Belton native

March 31, 2008

Tad Bartimus, who wrote a Teen Talk column for the Belton Star Herald years ago, received the Washington Press Club Foundation’s Lifetime Achievement Award in February at the annual Congressional Dinner.
Bartimus was 15 when her journalism career began with the Belton Star Herald. Publisher Joe Mauer hired her to work on Saturdays, taking subscriptions and cleaning up the office. She began writing Teen Talk at 16, when she was a sophomore.
The 1965 Belton High School graduate became the first female AP bureau chief and was named a Pulitzer Prize finalist twice.
Bartimus and her husband have lived in Hawaii for the past 12 years. She is a volunteer writing coach at the high school where her husband teaches sixth grade. She writes a weekly commentary, Among Friends, for United Feature Syndicate.
While working for the AP, Bartimus covered the war in Vietnam, reported from Europe and Latin America and was a roving correspondent in the United States. She covered the construction of the Alaska pipeline just before being appointed AP bureau chief.
Since leaving the AP in 1993, she has been a professor of journalism in Anchorage and has served as a professor-in-residence at the Missouri School of Journalism, her alma mater, and other universities.
Bartimus was nominated for Pulitzers in feature writing in 1989 and 1991. She founded the Journalism and Women Symposium in 1985.
—from the Belton Star Herald

Nevada Daily Mail switches to morning

March 31, 2008

The Nevada Daily Mail and Sunday Herald-Tribune and their partner, the Fort Scott Tribune in Kansas, switched from afternoon to morning publication on March 1.
Publisher Julie Righter said the change will give readers news earlier in the day, including sports results from the previous evening. Papers will be on vending racks by 6 a.m., she said.
The papers also switched from delivering subscriber copies by carrier to using the mail. The Sunday Herald-Tribune has become a weekend paper and is delivered in the Saturday mail.
The Monday edition of the Fort Scott Tribune has been discontinued. Classified sections of the Nevada and Fort Scott papers have been combined.
Rust Communications, Cape Girardeau, owns the papers.

Reporter docked pay for playing at event

March 31, 2008

David Knopf, a reporter and editor for The Kansas City Star, was suspended for a day after he played his guitar at a city councilman’s fundraiser in February. The Star considered it a
violation of its code of ethics.
Knopf was hired to play at the 55th birthday celebration of Councilman Ed Ford. Guests were encouraged to donate $50 or more to Ford’s campaign committee.
Knopf did not contribute or help organize the event, but The Star’s code limits journalists’ participation in public political events and generally prohibits staff from working at fundraising events.
He returned the money he received for performing to the event’s organizer.
—from The Kansas City Star

K.C. Star names Zieman publisher

March 31, 2008

Mark Zieman, editor of The Kansas City Star since mid-1997, has been named publisher of the newspaper.
He succeeds Mac Tully, who resigned in February to join Denver-based MediaNews Group.
The McClatchy Co., The Star’s owner since early 2006, appointed Zieman, who served as in-
terim publisher since Tully’s departure. Zieman said he would hire an editor to replace him as soon as possible.
Zieman, 47, joined The Star in 1986 after working in the Houston bureau of The Wall Street Journal for two years.
In 1989 he became editor of The Star’s projects desk, where he oversaw an examination of the U.S. Department of Agriculture that won a Pulitzer Prize in the spring of 1992.
He became managing editor for news in 1992 and was promoted to editor of the newspaper five years later.
—The Kansas City Star

Another Triple Crown for The Star

March 31, 2008

The Kansas City Star’s Sports Daily section has captured another Triple Crown — a top-10 ranking in daily section, Sunday section and special section. Judging by The Associated Press Sports Editors was done in Orlando.
It was The Star’s second straight Triple Crown and its third since 2003. No other paper with circulation over 250,000 won the Triple Crown this year.
The Star also won nine top-10 writing awards.
•Joe Posnanski and Jason Whitlock placed in the top 10 for column writing, the second time in the past three years they have done so.
•Bill Reiter and Blair Kerkhoff won in the explanatory stories category for pieces on the MU-KU rivalry.
•In feature writing, Sam Mellinger won for a story about figure skater Tonya Harding, Posnanski placed for a story from Japan about Royals manager Trey Hillman, and Reiter won for a profile of a Royals prospect.
•In the game-story category, Posnanski won for his story about Zach Johnson winning the Masters golf championship, and Reiter won for a story about a drag race.
•In project reporting, The Star won a top-10 ranking for a package that examined the influence of money in football. Contributing to that project were Candace Buckner, Randy Covitz, Kerkhoff, Jason King, J. Brady McCollough, Mellinger, Posnanski, Reiter, Howard Richman, Adam Teicher and Mechelle Voepel.
During the past five years, The Star has won more top-10 awards than any other paper in the 250,000 and over circulation division.
Its award in the special section category was for a preview devoted to pitching aces.
—from The Kansas City Star

Obit – James Lawrence Burrows

March 31, 2008

James Lawrence Burrows, 59, a reporter and photographer for the Neosho Daily News for 22 years, died of heart disease on March 5, 2008. He was employed by Newton County at the time of his death.